Teen Services at Lane Library are for students in grades 6-12, parents, caregivers, educators and anyone who would benefit from the Library's young adult collection.
Reblogged from friscolibrary  238 notes

universitybookstore:

Not Quite Shakespeare, Shakespeare Adaptations

This morning’s post on the new Library of America volume, Shakespeare in America: An Anthology from the Revolution to Now, made some members of our staff recall their favourite Shakespeare productions. Of course, some of our favourites aren’t quite the most “faithful” to the Bard’s original text—here’s just a few that range from the silly to the sublime.

  • O [Othello]
  • Ten Things I Hate about You [The Taming of the Shrew]
  • A Midsummer Night’s Rave [A Midsummer Night’s Dream]
  • She’s the Man [Twelfth Night]
  • Forbidden Planet [The Tempest]
  • Strange Brew [Hamlet]
  • The Lion King [Hamlet]
  • Ran [King Lear]
  • Throne of Blood [Macbeth]
  • West Side Story [Romeo and Juliet]
Reblogged from arlingtonvalib  1,258 notes

The biggest issue with equating the library with a Netflix for books is that it sends a false message that libraries are worth little more than $8 or $12 or $20 a month. That the services offered in libraries are little more than options to which people can subscribe, rather than actual services anyone can utilize at any time.

When the library is made to be seen as a business, rather than the heart of a community or a fundamental service made possible through citizen-approved tax dollars, it makes the library expendable. That expendability then moves down the chain: staff salaries get cut, then staff withers, then more programs and projects that benefit the community — books and movies and CDs and magazines and newspapers and wifi and computer access and database subscriptions and programs for all shapes, colors, and sizes of people — disappear, too. It detracts from the unique aspects that make a library what it is: a place for all, rather than a place for some.

Libraries reach out where Netflix reaches in.

By

from Libraries Are Not a “Netflix” for Books.  (via catagator)

Definitely go read the whole post, because YES. Also: I love you, libraries. I appreciate Netflix (er, sometimes), but I will never love it with the fiery heat of a thousand suns combined with the love of all books (but separate to prevent an Alexandria situation) because it is no YOU.

(via gwendabond)

Reblogged from theparisreview  222 notes
theparisreview:

Jules Verne was unquestionably imaginative: a science-fiction pioneer. And yet … “Verne may be a master of sorts, but he is not a master of high art. A casual reader, even in English translation, can see that Verne’s prose is rarely more than serviceable and that it gets overheated when he presumes to court eloquence … Each of Verne’s heroes is a nonpareil, the most remarkable man in the world—as long as the reader is immersed in his particular story.”
For more of this morning’s roundup,

theparisreview:

Jules Verne was unquestionably imaginative: a science-fiction pioneer. And yet … “Verne may be a master of sorts, but he is not a master of high art. A casual reader, even in English translation, can see that Verne’s prose is rarely more than serviceable and that it gets overheated when he presumes to court eloquence … Each of Verne’s heroes is a nonpareil, the most remarkable man in the world—as long as the reader is immersed in his particular story.”

For more of this morning’s roundup,